You asked: Where should we store token?

A JWT needs to be stored in a safe place inside the user’s browser. If you store it inside localStorage, it’s accessible by any script inside your page. This is as bad as it sounds; an XSS attack could give an external attacker access to the token.

Why should we store tokens?

Tokens stored in localStorage are automatically protected from CSRF attacks, because localStorage items are not automatically sent to servers with each HTTP request. It will still be automatically sent with each HTTP request, so it’s still vulnerable to CSRF attacks. …

Is it safe to store token in cookie?

With cookies, the access token is still hidden, attackers could only carry out “onsite” attacks. The malicious scripts injected into the web app could be limited, or it might not be very easy to change/inject more scripts. Users or web apps might need to be targeted first by attackers.

Should you store tokens in local storage?

Most developers are afraid of storing tokens in LocalStorage due to XSS attacks. While LocalStorage is easy to access, the problem actually runs a lot deeper. In this article, we investigate how an attacker can bypass even the most advanced mechanisms to obtain access tokens through an XSS attack.

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Why you should not store tokens in local storage?

Local storage is vulnerable because it’s easily accessible using JavaScript and an attacker can retrieve your access token and use it later. However, while httpOnly cookies are not accessible using JavaScript, this doesn’t mean that by using cookies, you are safe from XSS attacks involving your access token.

How do you store tokens in cookies?

Store your access token in memory, and store the refresh token in the cookie: Link to this section

  1. Use the httpOnly flag to prevent JavaScript from reading it.
  2. Use the secure=true flag so it can only be sent over HTTPS.
  3. Use the SameSite=strict flag whenever possible to prevent CSRF.

How do I protect my JWT tokens?

JWT Security Best Practices

  1. Intro. …
  2. JWTs used as Access Tokens. …
  3. What algorithms to use. …
  4. When to validate the token. …
  5. Always check the issuer. …
  6. Always check the audience. …
  7. Make sure tokens are used as intended. …
  8. Dealing with expiration, issued time and clock skew.

How do I invalidate a token?

A common approach for invalidating tokens when a user changes their password is to sign the token with a hash of their password. Thus if the password changes, any previous tokens automatically fail to verify.

How do I protect my local storage data?

serving all content (when online) from a single trusted server over ssl. validating all data going to and from local storage on the server using owasp antisamy project. in the network section of the appcache, not using *, and instead listing only the URIs required for connection with the trusted server.

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Is local storage safe?

Local storage is inherently no more secure than using cookies. When that’s understood, the object can be used to store data that’s insignificant from a security standpoint.

Should you store refresh token in DB?

Store refresh tokens in a secure location, such as a password-protected file system or an encrypted database. Limit access to users who need the tokens to make API calls. If you believe that a refresh token has been accessed by an unauthorized user, delete it and create a new one.

Where does Auth0 store token?

Browser in-memory scenarios. Auth0 recommends storing tokens in browser memory as the most secure option. Using Web Workers to handle the transmission and storage of tokens is the best way to protect the tokens, as Web Workers run in a separate global scope than the rest of the application.

Where are Web API tokens stored?

By default the token is not stored by the server. Only your client has it and is sending it through the authorization header to the server. If you used the default template provided by Visual Studio, in the Startup ConfigureAuth method the following IAppBuilder extension is called: app.